Yellowstone National Park Photos | Yellowstone Falls | Grand Prismatic

Yellowstone National Park Landscape Photography

Yellowstone National Park Fine Art Prints

My Yellowstone National Park landscape photography prints are for sale showcasing the year-round beauty of the Park. These Limited Edition, Museum Quality photographs are available as Fine Art prints, Metal prints and Acrylic prints. Large scale prints up to 8 feet or more in size are available.

Bring Home The Experience!

These Yellowstone National Park Prints and Wall Art allow you the opportunity to re-live an experience or imagine being there from within your own home. One of these beautiful pictures of Yellowstone National Park will add a dramatic focal point to any room!


Click on any image to view the available purchase options and pricing.


My Personal Invitation To You

I personally invite you to begin your journey as a fine art collector. I will work with you every step of the way, from the selection of one of my Florida landscape photographs to the selection of the print style and will keep you up to date of the printing and delivery process. The end result will be a fine art photograph that will add beauty to your home or office and become a cherished possession.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions regarding the process of purchasing a print.


Fine Art Print and Wall Art Options

My photographs of Yellowstone National Park are available for you to purchase as Fine Art Prints or Wall Art and place in your home or office. They are for sale as Frameless or Framed Lumachrome® HD Trulife® Acrylic Prints, Exhibit Mounted Metal Prints, and Fuji Crystal Archive Paper Prints. After selecting the desired photo, just select the type and size of print you would like to purchase in the area beneath the photo.

If you are looking for a different size than what is shown or have any other special needs, please contact us.

For more information and details regarding these museum quality landscape prints for sale, please click on this link to my Print Options page. I believe my photographic artwork can brighten up any room and I invite you to see some illustrations of this on my On The Wall page.


Visiting and Photographing Yellowstone National Park

My first visit to Yellowstone National Park was when I was 10 years old. It was the highlight of a family trip out west. I have returned many times in recent years for landscape photography and would like to share my thoughts and experiences of this amazing National Park.

It's hard to resist a day or two in Jackson, Wyoming and Grand Teton National Park before heading north to Yellowstone. The Park basically consists of two large loops. On the west side of the lower loop is the Old Faithful Visitor Center and geyser basin, a great place to start your exploration and photography.

Always check with the Visitor Center for the estimated eruption times of Old Faithful and other geysers. Photographing Old Faithful is best done early or late in the day and against a blue sky, so the geyser spray doesn’t get lost in the clouds.

Continuing up the road from Old Faithful brings you to Grand Prismatic Spring. The colors in this Spring are fantastic for photography. In addition to walking around the spring, there is an elevated overlook that you can hike up to that gives you a bird’s eye view.

The road continues north and parallels the Fire Hole River until it intersects with the Madison River. The road that heads west to West Yellowstone, Montana is a great place to look for Elk, especially in the Fall. The main road continues north past Gibbon Falls, perhaps second only to Yellowstone Falls in its appeal.

Turning right onto the Norris Canyon Road, next to the Norris Geyser Basin, will take you to the Canyon Area, where you can check out and photograph Yellowstone Falls from several spots including Artist Point, and my favorite, the Lookout Point on the west side of the Yellowstone River.

South from the Falls is the beautiful Hayden Valley, with the Yellowstone River winding through its open pastures. It’s best to wait until at least mid-June to photograph here, as before that, there can be multiple patches of snow and brown fields. A little further south is Mud Volcano, Yellowstone Lake and the West Thumb Geyser Basin.

North from the Falls, you will travel past Dunraven Pass and Mount Washburn, a very popular area for bears. Keep on the lookout, and if you hike a trail here or at any of the other back country locations, be sure to carry bear spray. North of there is Tower Falls, which is just before you get to the road that heads east to Lamar Valley.

To allow access to Cooke City in the winter, the road from Gardiner, Montana to Cooke City is kept cleared. It is the only road in the park open to vehicles in the winter. I have spent many days along this road in the winter, back when I was doing more wildlife photography and was in search of Wolves, Elk and Coyotes. Bison are present there year-round, and it is a great place to photograph them covered in snow. In the winter, the snow pillows on Soda Butte Creek are just perfect.

Just south of Gardiner is Mammoth Hot Springs. It is well worth a stop and can be photographed both from below the spring and from a boardwalk at the top.

I cannot possibly cover all of the photo opportunities in Yellowstone National Park in this short summary. These are just some of the highlights, and I encourage anyone visiting or photographing in the park to do sufficient research in advance in order to make the best use of your time there.

I hope you are able to make it there and have as much fun there as I always do. As I write this, I am thinking about all the places I have missed and how I need to go back.


Fun Facts About Yellowstone National Park

We’re Number One! That is what a cheer for Yellowstone National Park would sound like as Yellowstone was the United States’ first National Park – established on March 1, 1872 by President Grant and Congress. Yellowstone was designated a UNESCO biosphere reserve in 1976 and a World Heritage site in 1978. Most of Yellowstone lies in Wyoming but parts of it are also in Montana and Idaho.

The first person of European ancestry to venture into the Yellowstone region was American trapper and explorer John Colter, who reached the area in 1807–08. Colter had been a part of the Lewis and Clark Expedition but left the group in 1806.

One of the most iconic images that comes to mind when thinking about Yellowstone Park is the famous geyser, Old Faithful—which erupts an average of every 92 minutes. The eruptions last from 1.5 to 5.5 minutes. Visitors are impressed by the billowing steam and watch as 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of hot water are ejected high into the air at each eruption.

Yellowstone is also known for its steamy, boiling hot springs and multi-colored mud pots. You can walk along the boardwalks past the blue green pools and take in the various natural geothermal features.

You can travel south of Yellowstone via the John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway, (an 80-mile drive established in 1972) to the Grand Teton National Park. Rockefeller was a conservationist and philanthropist who was instrumental in the creation and enlargement of many national parks. The drive is filled with remains of old homesteads and iconic vistas. This is a great improvement from the early years of the park when travel to and in the park was challenging.

Additionally, in early days, travelers had to deal with the ongoing fighting between Native Americans and the U.S. government. The Battle of the Little Bighorn (June 1876) had taken place only some 150 miles to the northeast of Yellowstone. The following year Chief Joseph and followers traveled through Yellowstone in their attempt to evade capture by U.S. troops. They briefly held several park visitors hostage before all escaped or were released.

By the numbers: Yellowstone National Park contains 3,472 square miles and measures 63 miles north to south and 54 miles east to west. The highest point in the park is 11,358' at Eagle Peak and the lowest point in the park is 5,282' at Reese Creek. There are more than 300 active geysers and more than 290 waterfalls. There are five park entrances and 466 miles of roads with 15 miles of boardwalk.

Do you like hiking and enjoy a variety of trails to hike? Then Yellowstone National Park is your kind of place as there are 92 trailheads that access approximately 1,000 miles of trails.

Besides hiking, waterfalls, and geysers, Yellowstone is also famous for its many scenic lakes and rivers—the largest is Yellowstone Lake which has a surface area of 132 square miles. It is lying at an elevation of 7,730 feet making it the highest mountain lake of its size in North America.

Last but not least, Yellowstone National Park played a behind the scenes role in the antics of Yogi Bear who lived at the fictional Jellystone Park which was based on Yellowstone. Yogi first appeared in The Huckleberry Hound Show (1958) and in 1961 was given his own show. Yogi, with his companion Boo-Boo Bear would often try to steal picnic (pic-a-nic) baskets from the campers in the park—making trouble for Park Ranger Smith. His trademark line—“I’m smarter than the av-er-age bear” would be said to convince himself and Boo-Boo Bear that he would be able to snatch the campers’ picnic items.

I don’t know if Yogi was smarter than the “av-er-age bear” but I would agree with him that eating a picnic lunch at Yellowstone National Park would be an experience that one would treasure. I hope the photos in this gallery will encourage you to visit the park…hike the trails….see the iconic vistas…. and eat a picnic lunch.


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Trip Reports

https://www.josephfiler.com/gallery/fall-yellowstone-teton-photography-report/